Wade Davis

Wade Davis is perhaps the most articulate and influential western advocate for the world’s indigenous cultures.

A National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence, he has been described as “a rare combination of scientist, scholar, photographer, poet and passionate defender of all of life's diversity. Trained in anthropology and botany at Harvard, he travels the globe to live alongside indigenous people, and document their cultural practices in books, photographs, and film.

Davis is the author of fifteen books including The Serpent and the Rainbow, One River, and The Wayfarers. His many film credits include Light at the Edge of the World, an eight-hour documentary series produced for the National Geographic that is airing in over 165 countries.

His photographs have appeared in 30 books and more than 100 magazines and journals, and his research has been the subject of more than 900 reports in the media, as well as three episodes of the X-Files.

In 2009 he received the Gold Medal from the Royal Canadian Geographical Society for his contributions to anthropology and conservation, and he is the 2011 recipient of the Explorers Medal, the highest award of the Explorers’ Club, and the 2012 recipient of the Fairchild Medal for Plant Exploration. He was named by GHS as one of the Explorers for the Millennium.

A professional speaker for over 25 years, Davis has spoken at over 150 universities, the Aspen Institute, and Bohemian Grove. He currently serves on the board of the Amazon Conservation Association and as a member of the TED Brain Trust. His recent travels have taken him to East Africa, Borneo, Nepal, Peru, Polynesia, Tibet, Mali, Benin, Togo, New Guinea, Australia, Colombia, Vanuatu, Mongolia and the high Arctic of Nunavut and Greenland.

Wade Davis is perhaps the most articulate and influential western advocate for the world’s indigenous cultures.

A National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence, he has been described as “a rare combination of scientist, scholar, photographer, poet and passionate defender of all of life's diversity. Trained in anthropology and botany at Harvard, he travels the globe to live alongside indigenous people, and document their cultural practices in books, photographs, and film.

Davis is the author of fifteen books including The Serpent and the Rainbow, One River, and The Wayfarers. His many film credits include Light at the Edge of the World, an eight-hour documentary series produced for the National Geographic that is airing in over 165 countries.

His photographs have appeared in 30 books and more than 100 magazines and journals, and his research has been the subject of more than 900 reports in the media, as well as three episodes of the X-Files.

In 2009 he received the Gold Medal from the Royal Canadian Geographical Society for his contributions to anthropology and conservation, and he is the 2011 recipient of the Explorers Medal, the highest award of the Explorers’ Club, and the 2012 recipient of the Fairchild Medal for Plant Exploration. He was named by GHS as one of the Explorers for the Millennium.

A professional speaker for over 25 years, Davis has spoken at over 150 universities, the Aspen Institute, and Bohemian Grove. He currently serves on the board of the Amazon Conservation Association and as a member of the TED Brain Trust. His recent travels have taken him to East Africa, Borneo, Nepal, Peru, Polynesia, Tibet, Mali, Benin, Togo, New Guinea, Australia, Colombia, Vanuatu, Mongolia and the high Arctic of Nunavut and Greenland.